Boundless In Space
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About the artwork

Interactive sculpture

Boundless in Space – exhibited both in London and in Aarhus – looks like a bizarre, pink creature which reacts in movement and in sound to the position and proximity of its spectators.

The pink sculptural form is interactive and augmented with responsive robotics and moves ever so slightly as it is approached. The movement is random but its stays within a certain area. Its main body is covered with peculiar, spore-like semi spheres and growths, some of which appear to have escaped across the floor and which scuttle away, clicking nervously when approached by blundering feet.

Electronics by Sam Woolf

Exhibitions

Hub: National Centre for Craft & Design, UK 2009.
The Shire Hall Gallery, UK 2007.
Aarhus Kunstbygning (Centre for Contemporary Art), Denmark 2002.
The Big Blip 03, Festival of creative arts, science and technology, UK 2003.
Antenna Studios CP Artists Signal, London, UK, 2003.
Foyer Gallery, Farnham, UK, 2002.

What people said

…Her tactile materials are reminders of physicality – we want to touch her objects, we need to walk around them, to experience them, to meet them and they interact with us, responding to our proximity.
– Tracey Warr, Materialisation

…At an exhibition in Brighton a child flung himself onto the sculpture ‘Boundless in Space’, as if it were a giant pillow. Bech watched in horror and fury, shortly followed by relief when it emerged unbroken from underneath the offending boy. But she concede to being flattered – he had merely succumbed to the urge that she aims to elicit.
– Lucy Manning, Features Tine Bech

In Bech’s practice the absence of pompous statements, of grand schemes awards the work a force which is quietly subversive, implicating the viewer in an active relationship. A lingering impression, a gentle vulnerability, a greater subtlety of meaning is offered, allowing space for coming to terms with its substance and freedom to define or leave unsaid. 
– Christine Kapteijn ‘Outside Gets Inside’

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